Tag Archives: naropa university

Online Feature-Somatic Book Review of Beast Feast

Somatic Book Review of Beast Feast by Cody-Rose Clevidence

BeastFeastImageCody-Rose Clevidence
Beast Feast
Ahsahta Press
$18


Before beginning, take a butter knife from the kitchen counter drawer and begin to saw off your breasts [or] before beginning, take a butter knife from the kitchen counter drawer and begin to saw off your penis and balls. A steak knife will not do, you really want to feel the irony here of the most delicate weapon in the vicinity causing the highest intensity of pain. DO NOT WASH THE BODY PARTS DOWN THE DISPOSAL ! I instruct you to use them as book marks. You may need time to rest your eyes in between pages, as the content is rather mindfully invigorating, and it will be appropriate while coming back unto a page to have a reminder of the parts of you that did not exists as parts, but as an extension of the whole, before you were so mercilessly dragged through the poetic forrest that is Clevidence’s mind. A book that makes you WORK. Red gatorade is not recommended for hydration, the dye stains your insides and we might need those for later. Water is best, unless you reside in a city where Whole Foods is more rampant than water supply, in which case certified organic coconut water will do (however, do not drink the milk of the actual certified organic coconut, which excessive consumption has in some cases been known to cause diarrhea, which will cause, most obviously, dehydration).
Furthermore, embarrassment is expected once the blood stains swim into abstract pool designs on your respective boob or ball areas, but this book is really not meant to be consumed in the corner crevice of a couch in your mother’s basement. It is meant, obviously, to be experienced in the presence of beasts.
Any preschool will do, really. I recommend volunteering for story-time around page 52. Scream (I do not mean this gently) SCREAM the words into their wild, absurdly bendy little human ears until they are satiated to the point of missing snack time. Before encountering the last page, run! (I do not mean this gently) RUN ! Nearing the end of the last page, you will be, physically, a deformed running beast, captured and consumed by the sticky hands of small beasts, booked marked in time of death by severed breasts and/or balls. This is, arguably so, the preferred state of being for whispering the last line, and truly offers such a visceral perspective for interpretation of the text as a whole.

REVIEW BY MARIE CONLAN

 

 

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Anselm Hollo Call For Submissions

Bombay Gin Issue 40: Anselm Hollo Call for Submissions open May 1, 2013 through September 1, 2013.

In January, our friend and colleague Anselm Hollo passed away at the age of 78. A native of Helsinki, Finland, Anselm taught poetics and translation in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado since 1985. Anselm was the author of more than forty books of poetry, including Notes on the Possibilities and Attractions of Existence: New and Selected Poems 1965-2000 (2001), which won the San Francisco Poetry Center Book Award; AHOE (1997); Corvus (1995); Finite Continued (1980); and Sojourner Microcosms: New and Selected Poems 1959-1977 (1977). He also published a book of essays, Caws and Causeries: Around Poetry and Poets (1999). His many translations include works by Paavo Haavikko and Pentti Saarikoski, for whose Trilogy (2003) Hollo received the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets.

In accord with Naropa University’s 40th Anniversary and in memory of our beloved Anselm Hollo, Issue 40 of Bombay Gin will include a section devoted to Anselm, which might include work dedicated to or inspired by Anselm as well as remembrances, essays, or critical responses to his work.

This call for submissions runs from May 1, 2013 through September 1, 2013.  In general, we welcome manuscripts of prose, poetry, and cross-genre work. Poetry submissions should be comprised of 3-5 poems; prose and cross-genre manuscripts should generally consist of no more than 15 pages. We accept submissions via Submittable. Please do not snail mail or email your work.

Please support the journal in which you want your work published. Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

BOMBAY GIN

NAROPA UNIVERSITY

2130 ARAPAHOE AVE

BOULDER, CO 80302

 

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Letter from the Editor: Bombay Gin 39.1

When Art and Layout Editor Brenna Lee gave CAConrad a choice between fertility, transgression, and contemplative poetics, CA choose “transgression” and “contemplative poetics.” And so the theme of issue 39.1 is “The Contemplative as Transgressive.” Actually, the idea originally occurred as I considered a contemplative writing course I was set to teach this fall for the Jack Kerouac School’s low-residency MFA program. At the beginning of the summer, I posed it to the 2012-13 Bombay Gin board, and, as a thought will, it became spirit and then body.

All themed issues are a mix of constraint and spontaneity; the result is a rich interpretation of Bombay Gin’s unique contemplative heritage. Naropa University was founded in 1974 as the Naropa Institute by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, a lineage holder of both the Kagyü and Nyingma Buddhist traditions. To this day, Naropa identifies itself as a Buddhist-inspired university, committed to integrating the active life of scholarship and activism with the contemplative life of study and meditative practices. In the Jack Kerouac School in particular, we grapple with how to articulate the synergy between contemplative practice and “radical exploration and experimentation” (as our website boasts).

I think part of this difficulty lies in the necessity to (meta)articulate what is obvious: writing is already a contemplative practice, and, in this way, to write contemplatively requires both innovation and a conscious return to origin, whether this be self or intuition. As Marketing Editor Sally Smith brought to my attention, “radical” is one of those curious terms that contains in its definition the full range of extremes. Its Latin etymology means, “having roots,” while its more recent definition jettisons the term toward “extreme change from accepted or traditional forms.” I find this mongrel term especially fitting as a modifier not only because of its inclusion of the whole linear iteration of “exploration and experimentation,” but also because of the way that path becomes event, rupturing and redoubling (to use Derrida’s description of structuralism).

I suppose I originally proposed “transgressive” to mean something like “radical exertion”— transgression is what happens when the soul heaps “itself on that ridge” of “a self-evolving circle” and then “tends outward with a vast force, and to immense and innumerable expansion,” as Emerson writes in the essay, “Circles.” Western culture often understands the contemplative life as hermetic and isolated, bound, but this issue of Bombay Gin indicates that transgression is the inevitable trajectory of awareness. In the introduction to his five poems included in this issue, Reed Bye writes of  contemplative poetics, “What is ‘transgressed’ in such a contemplative approach are all the conceptual reflexes and boundaries mind encounters, beginning with biases toward oneself and extending out to judgments or ideas felt or perceived in the world.” Like the term “radical,” Reed’s insight both introduces and directs this issue of Bombay Gin, which, in ways we could have never predicted, follows the mind’s emergence from its backgrounds, its conditioning, its habitual responses.

One pattern of note is resonance with existentialism’s pour-soi or the conscious process of estranging the self from ideology and reification. In addition to CAConrad’s insightful interview with Brenna Lee, “(Soma)tic Disobedience,” I want to highlight Rebecca Brown’s “Transgressive Meditation”; Anna Joy Springer’s “Identity as Encounter: I as Thou in Discontinuous Memoir,” which directly references the existentialist theologian Martin Buber; Erik Anderson’s excerpt from Estranger; and Michele Auerbach’s essay on kari edwards, “Can I Do This Spiritual Drag.” Interfaith and interdisciplinary, these prose pieces push at boundaries of self, gender, and animal and suggest that while only the individual can do the work of revealing the reality of herself, she cannot access the truth of the self without also seeing herself in context of others.

The lovely “lyric” pieces (both prose and poetry) collected here also evidence this dialectic of self and other, even as that other fades into context of the poetic utterance. Barbara Henning, Mg Roberts, HR Hegnauer, Chris Martin, and Matthew Cooperman, to name only a few, express “a practice of active attention and direct engagement with things as they arise in perception, thought, or emotion, based in open curiosity and appreciation for experience as a whole,” to quote again from Reed Bye. In this same vein, we are also proud to curate two portfolios with art from Olivia Locher (whose photographs are on our cover), Debbie Carlos, and Ian Rummell. In a departure from our typical design, in which the image shares the page with its title and the artist’s name, we’ve allowed these images to saturate their space on the page, to be fully present lyric spaces.

Finally, we close the issue with several “experiments,” including CAConrad’s “(Soma)tic Exercise: Grave a Hole as Dream a Hole,” Angela Stubbs’ “Blue Ritual,” and Richard Cohen’s “Play the Platypus Game.” These exercises, rituals, games appropriately close the issue by opening a space for you, reader, to enter. To again, quote Reed Bye, “For the creative aspect of making (poetics), anything and everything happens from there.”

-J’Lyn Chapman

Please support the journal in which you want your work published. Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR BOMBAY GIN 39.2

Bombay Gin is taking submissions from February 1, 2013 through April 1, 2013.

In her introduction to the she said dialogues: flesh memory, Akilah Oliver offers the following definition of “flesh memory”: “the body’s truths and realities… everything that we’ve ever experienced or known, whether we know it directly or through some type of genetic memory, osmosis or environment.” Recognizing “the multiplicity of languages and realities” the bones hold, we can begin to identify the “demons” that haunts us. Grounded in dance and performance art, flesh memory becomes an embodied practice, an expression of culture and ancestral memory, as when Akilah writes, “this text is situated in the on-going work I’ve been doing in performance with the concept of flesh memory as it relates to a critical interrogation of the African American literary/performative tradition.”

With the late Akilah Oliver’s spirit and thought in mind, Bombay Gin invites submissions for issue 39.2 that explore “flesh memory.” We encourage contributors to extend Akilah’s “flesh memory.” Consider the following:

…what the body knows that the mind can’t hold, the DNA-memory of 500,000 years of human experience and 4 billion years of life on Earth, thinking is one way of knowing the world, the other is being…

…the memory of trauma, through repetition and the reinforcement of patterns, the body learns loneliness, self-destruction, body memory is paved into neural and muscular pathways….

… neuroplasticity—through consistent, positive action, dance, body work, we can heal the mind’s trauma that lies trapped in the body; like everything else, it is a matter of practice and patience, trial and error, repetition…

…how has the world impressed itself upon the body, how does the body hold its experiences? what does the body know? how do we return to the body? what does it mean to write from the body? how might flesh memory access the feral space below and beyond reason, the animal instinct and animal body?

We welcome manuscripts of fiction, essays, poetry, and cross-genre work. Poetry submissions should be comprised of 3-5 poems; prose and cross-genre manuscripts should generally consist of no more than 15 pages. Accompany each manuscript with a self-addressed stamped envelope for reply, and mail it to the following address:

BOMBAY GIN
NAROPA UNIVERSITY
JACK KEROUAC SCHOOL
2130 ARAPAHOE AVE.
BOULDER, CO 80302

Please support the journal in which you want your work published.  Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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Win Andrea Rexilius’ Half of What They Carried Flew Away

As Bombay Gin eagerly awaits our January 25th release party for issue 39.1, there is still time to win some of the books reviewed in the issue. In collaboration with Letter Machine Editions, we are pleased to announce a second book for our book giveaway:

Andrea Rexilius’ brilliant Half of What They Carried Flew Away

   rexilius cover final pic                      

Issue 39.1, in keeping with the theme of contemplative as transgressive, includes a provocative review of Half of What They Carried Flew Away by Ginger Teppner. Ginger is currently working on her MFA in the Low Residency program at Naropa University, and her forthcoming work includes Yew Journal and Upstairs at Duroc.

Below is an excerpt from Ginger’s review:

Some people fear movement away from what is comfortable, fear contradiction. Rexilius is not afraid. She embraces paradox by dispersing time. Time is always now despite perception; time is open—open as noun. She writes, “They come to the open between each breath.” In essence, she creates a system of being which chooses to stay in one place (form) while transitioning seamlessly in(to) another. There is no need for preparation. Time is both visible and a multiple of itself—both witness and the observed. To accept this discrepancy is to trust Rexilius when she directs us, the readers, to investigate how we normally look at the world. Looking, apparently, is not the same as seeing. In this era when separation and discontinuity (instability) reign supreme, the possibility of existing in wholeness while alone but not isolated (stability) allows catharsis.

Excited to read more? Come get a copy of 39.1 on January 25th!

For a signed copy of Half of What They Carried Flew Away, please leave a comment below telling us why you’re interested.

The window to enter this giveaway will close at Midnight MST on Thursday, January 17th, and the winner will be randomly chosen through random.org

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Bombay Gin Announces Release Party for Issue 39.1

We are pleased to announce the release party for Issue 39.1. Celebrate our writing community and join us for an evening of readings and performances by some of the contributors to this issue. This event is free and open to the public:

Bombay Gin 39.1 Release Party

Friday, January 25, 7 p.m.

Goldfarb Student Center (basement of the Admin Building next to Allen Ginsberg Library)

Naropa’s Arapahoe Campus

2130 Arapahoe Avenue

Boulder, CO 80302

Performers Include:

Anna Avery

Reed Bye

Matthew Cooperman with Aby Kaupang

Angel Dominguez with Jason Burks

HR Hegnauer, Serena Chopra, and Michelle Auerbach

Robert Snyderman with Sam Knights

Promises to be a great night! Hope to see you there.

-Chris

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Rebecca Brown Profile

Rebecca Brown, an inspiring contributor in our upcoming issue of Bombay Gin, is also an open and authentically down-to-earth writer. From interactions with students at Naropa’s SWP 2012, it is also apparent that she cares. A lot. She cares about religion, about human rights, and about her students.

rebecca brown photo

I caught up with Rebecca recently. Here’s a bit of what she’s up to:

June Lucarotti: What books have you recently been excited about?

Rebecca Brown: I am excited by the new book (a first book) by Suzanne Scanlon, PROMISING YOUNG WOMEN, published by the Dorothy Project. It’s smart and brutal and funny and really speaks to a lot of stuff of interest to me – the female mind, the experience of quasi real or misunderstood ‘madness’, religious longing and its perversions. The prose is really excellent too. I am also reading Gary Wills’ work about Augustine and thinking about that stuff. I also love Bombay Gin and Anne Waldman and all you guys and gals.

JL: What is your current contemplative practice?

RB: I still try to work with my Sacred Silence group every week and wish I did so more.

JL: What inspires you lately?

RB: I am listening to Sunny Day Real Estate’s old music and right now have Bruno Mars on my CD player. I am awaiting a visit from CA Conrad, whom I have never met but whose work I TREMENDOUSLY admire. I have invited CA to visit my class where I teach at UW Botell in the new MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics program. He will read tonight too, and I hope he wears a tiara.

Look for Rebecca’s insightful reflection on “Transgressive Meditation” in Bombay Gin’s upcoming issue!

Rebecca Brown is currently writing essays, parables, and more. She is creating cut and paste altered books. She currently has an installation and an altered book exhibit up at the Frye Art Museum in Seattle. Her most recent book is AMERICAN ROMANCES (City Lights, 2009), and she has recent work in PAGEBOY, the Frye Museum blog, and elsewhere. Her writing also often appears online in THE STRANGER. Rebecca presently teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics program at UW Bothell and the low-residency MFA at Goddard College.

-June

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Win Suzanne Scanlon’s Promising Young Women

To celebrate our anticipation of issue 39.1, as we proof and proof, Bombay Gin editors are excited to kick off a series of book giveaways.  I’m proud to announce our first giveaway is in collaboration with Dorothy, A Publishing Project, a small press edited by the fantastic Danielle Dutton that brings us innovative “fiction, or near fiction, or about fiction, mostly by women.”

Dorothy publishes two books a year, in complement to one another, and Bombay Gin will publish reviews of and give away BOTH of the 2012 pair.

First: Suzanne Scanlon’s Promising Young Women.

Naropa University M.F.A. candidate Rachel M. Newlon’s review of Scanlon’s first book will appear in forthcoming (think January) 39.1.  Rachel’s work has been published online (Thirteen Myna Birds, Big River Poetry Review, Horse Less Press, Cactus Heart, Foliate Oak Literary Journal) as well as in print (A Poet’s View of Being, Erasure, Bombay Gin).  Rachel’s interview with Suzanne Scanlon enriches her thoughtful review.

Here is a little taste:

…women within the pages of Scanlon’s writings struggle to have a recognizable voice in a world that is unable to accept their gender, their madness and in which they have no part to play.  Promising Young Women mirrors the content of the ward book – scientifically exposing perspective, stereotypes, bias, and failure.

Scanlon’s writing induces a confusing sense of eternity – the reader is lost in this place, where events perpetuate repetitiously, realistically, with no hope of ceasing.  Scanlon merges pastiche and iconic cultural references about females and madness into a skillfully written piece that is nearly impossible to ignore.

I promise, you want to read this—Scanlon’s book and BG 39.1.

For a chance to win a free copy of Promising Young Women, simply leave a comment below telling us why you’re interested.

The window to enter this giveaway will close at Midnight MST on Friday, November 30th, and the winner will be randomly chosen via random.org.

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Some Helpful Submission Tips from Bombay Gin

Submitting creative work to a publication can be nerve racking for a number of reasons, especially if it is your first time. Gaining publication is an essential part of a working writer’s life, so here is a list of tips to help you along the way to becoming established writers.

1. Do Not Fear Rejection

This tip is the most important one I can give. You cannot fear rejection; it is going to happen, and it is ok. This is the first thing you, as a writer, need to grasp and understand. It is hard to send off your own work to be judged and analyzed by various editorial panels, but you should never take a rejection too close to heart. A rejection doesn’t mean anything about the quality of your writing. You could receive a rejection for any number of reasons. For example, your piece might not have fit the journal’s theme, you didn’t follow the journals guidelines, or the journal might not even read your work, because there is just too much to read. Whatever the case, you just need to continue to send your work to a number of publishers. Just be patient and have no fear; your work will find a home.

2. Submit to Journals You Like

Do your homework. When you are looking to submit work for publication, you should always look at journals that you admire or enjoy. Submit to journals you are familiar with so you know what type of work they publish. Mention in your cover letter that you have knowledge of the publication; it presents dedication on your part. Just make sure, regardless of where you submit, you do your research and take the time to learn about the publication. Take the time to read their mission statement. Know to whom you are submitting.

3. Follow the Guidelines

Always make sure to read and follow the guidelines for each journal and magazine to which you submit. Each journal has specific submissions guidelines. A journal’s guidelines tell you things like when to submit, how many pieces/pages to submit, the format in which to submit, and whether they take simultaneous submissions, among other things. Not following the guidelines gives the publisher an excuse to recycle your work and give you an immediate rejection. This is obviously what you are trying to avoid so always make sure to read the guidelines carefully first before submitting anything.

4. Write a Good Cover Letter.

A strong cover letter is essential, and you should take the time to create a template cover letter you can use to submit to various publications. A good cover letter should do the following:

  • Tout your accomplishments without telling your life story. You should mention your achievements, such as other publications and awards, but keep it brief. Most editors do not want to read an autobiography, because they have enough submissions to read as it is. Always update your letter as you accomplish more.
  • Include your contact information (address, number, email, etc). This way, the editors can contact with you about your submission or know where to send correspondance.
  • Mention your prior knowledge of the publication. This shows that you have taken the time to examine the publication before submitting and that you have connection with that particular publisher.
  • Makes you more appealing. For example, use “completing” instead of saying “going for my degree” when talking about your education. “Completing” tells a publisher that you are hard at work toward your goal and loyal to your craft.
  • Be courteous. Thank the editors for taking the time to read your work. Editors have a lot of reading and work on their hands.

5. Submit to as Many Places as You Can.

Most publications allow for simultaneous submissions, which means you can submit work to them that you have already submitted to other publishers. Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket, because what is not good for one journal might be good for another. If you do end up submitting work simultaneously, always make sure to contact other publishers after a piece gets picked up for publication so they know to disregard it from your submission.

6. Keep Track.

Create a chart or someway of organizing where you have submitted work. This is for your own personal record and sanity.

7. Be Patient.

Give the editors time to get back to you. If you submitted work to a journal two days ago, then don’t start asking them about the status of your submission. Likely, they haven’t even had a second to look at the majority of submissions they have received. It can take a few months for you to receive any word. If you haven’t heard anything from a publisher in over a few months then just assume your work was rejected and move on from there.

There is a lot of pressure, especially for younger writers, to gain publications in order to become more established. My hope is to help relieve some of that pressure with advice. Getting published is not easy; it takes a large amount of effort and persistence. These tips can get you on track toward gaining new honors and publications, setting you on the path toward becoming an established writer.

-Mike

Mike Malpiedi is a first year MFA candidate in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.  Mike also serves as Associate Editor, Graduate Assistant for Publications, for Bombay Gin.

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Call for Submissions

BOMBAY GIN is taking submissions from September 1, 2012 through October 1, 2012.

THEME: Please send submissions that respond to this issue’s theme of the “The Contemplative as Transgressive.” Writers and artists are encouraged to question and define “contemplative” and to consider how the contemplative, in addition to silent and calm, might also be transgressive, radical, allowing for an encounter with another space-time, an absolute other. In addition to your interpretations of the theme, we encourage you to submit contemplative writing experiments as well as the product of such experiments.

We welcome manuscripts of fiction, essays, poetry, and cross-genre work; we will not read manuscripts submitted after the reading period ends. Poetry submissions should be comprised of 3-5 poems; prose and cross-genre manuscripts should generally consist of no more than 15 pages. Accompany each manuscript with a self-addressed stamped envelope for reply, and mail it to the following address:

BOMBAY GIN
NAROPA UNIVERSITY
JACK KEROUAC SCHOOL
2130 ARAPAHOE AVE.
BOULDER, CO 80302

Visual artists may submit images through email: bgin@naropa.edu. Accepted submissions will be printed in black and white only. Please submit the following:

  • Professional quality digital images in TIFF or JPG formats (if JPG, saved in “baseline” or “standard” format at the highest quality possible). Images must be Mac and PC compatible. Note: Please do not submit PPT or PPTX presentations.
  • A minimum of 320 dpi
  • Between 1200 and 2400 pixels in the longest dimension
  • Please title image files with your last name and first initial, year of the work, title, medium and dimensions (example: Doe_J_2009_Title_oil on panel_9x12.jpg).
  • Brief biographical/artist statement as either a text file (Word) or as a PDF. Please title the file with your last name, first initial, and the content of the file (example: Doe_J_ArtistStatement.doc or Doe_J_Biography.doc).

Sample copies of the BOMBAY GIN can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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