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BOMBAY GIN EXTRAVAGANZA!

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What: Bombay Gin 41 Reading and Fundraising Extravaganza!

When: Thursday, November 13 7:00pm – 10:30pm MST

Where: Innisfree Poetry Bookstore and Cafe

Bombay Gin is pleased to announce an evening of reading and fundraising that is not to be missed. The festivities begin at 7pm on Thursday, November 13th with a reading featuring Boulder Tribe poet Jonathan Montgomery, Sacramento poet Ike Torres, and an open mic. Then at 9pm, the party gets started in the name of raising money to support the thriving of Bombay Gin. Refreshments will be served, conversations will be had, and most importantly, prizes will be won!

During the party, we will have a silent auction where you can bid on some mind blowing opportunities with some of your favorite poets. So far we have these confirmed items for your bidding pleasure:

A cassette tape made just for you by Thurston Moore

A personalized somatic ritual written for you by CA Conrad

A consultation on 25 pages of your writing OR a divination card reading by Selah Saterstrom

A personalized chapbook written for you by Mathias Svalina

A personalized care package and handwritten letter from TC Tolbert

Reed Bye taking you out for a drink

Michelle Naka Pierce treating you to chips and guac and a copy of her book Continuous Frieze Bordering Red

Tea with Naropa’s President Chuck Leif

You do not need to attend in order to participate in the auction. Just email your maximum bid for any of the above to bgin@naropa.edu by 10 pm Wednesday, November 12 in order to be included in the bidding. Be sure to include what item you’re bidding on and your contact information!

We will also have a raffle with prizes from City Lights, Les Figues Press, Counterpath, Factory Hollow Press, Boulder Book Store, Innisfree, Buchanan’s, and Cinemark. The more tickets you buy, the better your odds, so bring cash! (Unfortunately, raffle participation is only for those lucky folks who can make it to the party).

More prizes and auction items continue to roll in, so check back regularly for the latest information. Can’t wait to celebrate Bombay Gin with you all!

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Win Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi’s Fra Keeler

Bombay Gin editors are excited to continue our series of book giveaways celebrating our latest issue.  I’m proud to announce the second of our Dorothy double-feature.

In collaboration with Dorothy, A Publishing Project, we are offering a free copy of Fra Keeler by burgeoning writer Azareen Van der Vliet Oloomi.

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Naropa University M.F.A. candidate Denise Kinsley’s review of Fra Keeler appears in our latest issue. Denise has written grants for several non-profit theatre companies and most recently won an award from The National Endowment for the Arts. She has been involved with theater companies in New York, Portland, and San Diego.

From Kinsley’s review:

…Fra Keeler summons thinking that traces back through my own memories and propels me forward to dreams of future events. It is an extended, manic episode through an unnamed character’s exploration of what’s real and what’s true.

…Fra Keeler is an exploration and a performance of human consciousness. It reveals how the mind constructions illusion—such as momentary blindness—by attaching to dreams and memories.

To read the full review, along with the latest in experimental literature and art, buy a copy of Bombay Gin 39.1: The Contemplative as Transgressive.

For a chance to win a free copy of Oloomi’s haunting Fra Keeler, simply leave a comment below telling us why you’re interested.

The window to enter this giveaway will close at Midnight MST on Monday, March 11th, and the winner will be randomly chosen via random.org.

-Sally Jane

Please support the journal in which you want your work published. Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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Reflecting on Reed Bye’s Contemplative Poetics

Because the theme of Bombay Gin 39.1 (January 2013) is “The Contemplative as Transgressive,” I thought I’d offer an interpretation of Contemplative Poetics, based on my course work with Reed Bye at Naropa University. The following are excerpts from an essay, “Transitioning Inbetween to Open Space: Three Gates of Contemplative Poetics.

Contemplative Poetics, an investigation of perception, mind, body and speech to join heaven and earth, is the foundation for discovering the true nature of being: open space (Trungpa). The practice of meditation and poetry, along with teachings by Buddhist and literary scholars, illustrates spaciousness, to remind the practitioner, “Are you breathing?” As Allen Ginsberg wrote in “Meditation and Poetics,” “real poetry practitioners are practitioners of mind awareness, or practitioners of reality, expressing their fascination with a phenomenal universe and trying to penetrate to the heart of it” (262). Mind awareness begins with understanding the nature of reality and the mind. In order to glimpse our true nature, or bodhicitta mind (enlightened mind), contemplative practices (e.g. poetry, sitting meditation, yoga, dance) enable equanimity as one begins to practice non-dualism and non-judgment. Contemplative Poetics also introduces the notion of human existence as pertaining to three gates: body, speech, and mind (Thrangu Rinpoche 19). Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche’s “The Six Collections of Consciousness” questions, “What is a body for?” and “What are the limits of the body?” While the elements of the body, speech, and mind differ, they cannot be separated from the whole and lead to an awareness of the roots of attachment and aversion. This understanding is our capacity for a stable mind, happiness and the ability to live in open space.

As we begin to recognize our ultimate state of being, slowly-slowly, dancing to the quality of our breath, writing what we notice: dust dance, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s teachings in “The Development of Ego,” further defines this ultimate awareness. “Fundamentally there is just open space, the basic ground, what we really are.  Our most fundamental state of mind, before the creation of ego is such that there is basic openness, basic freedom, a spacious quality; and we have now and have always had this openness”(74). Ultimately, contemplative practice can allow one to understand the poisonous emotions that rule the mind, and eventually opens the heart to truth.

Poet-Bodhisattva

Allen Ginsberg’s “Meditation and Poetics” bravely calls the poet to take up a position, to explore consciousness and garner awareness of the “nature of reality and the nature of the mind” (262).  Poetry becomes a “probe,” a tool to purify the mind and eventually one is free to “let go” of thoughts. This practice of shedding the ego is an on-going practice that may begin in stillness; the body becomes the vessel in which one can begin to cultivate awareness, instead of solely being in the mind. Trungpa taught the importance of synchronizing the mind and body in Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, as “connected with how we synchronize or connect with the world…looking and seeing directly beyond language” (52). Thus, the poet may discover a vision that is beyond conventional language; cultivating space to wake up, to aid in the cessation of suffering. In this way, poets might live as bodhisattvas, those who are awakened and vow to live and work to awaken others who suffer. With the innovation of poetic forms, the poet begins to illustrate the three- interdependent gates of humanity: speech, body, and mind.

Birth of the Kerouac School

Awareness of open space containing human experience sparked the meeting of Trungpa and Ginsberg, and as a result, established the Jack Kerouac School, a ground for exploring humanity, including the five skandhas, or “heaps:” form, feeling, perception, concept and consciousness, which make up the ego, the gate of the mind and intellect (Trungpa 73). As poetry is a craft, a work of art that artists may attach a sense of self to, sentient beings can become overwhelmed with perception, “fascinated by our own creation, the static colors and the static energies. We want to relate to them, and so we begin gradually to explore our creation” (Trungpa 77). And yet as we engage in creation, Trungpa also wrote in “Joining Heaven and Earth” the absurdity of labeling oneself an “artist.” “We have to recognize how much neurosis comes out in works of art” (149). This identification as artist “prevents us from reaching beyond that particular scope” (149). “We begin to realize that the principle of dharma exists within us…relaxation can happen because such trust has become a part of our existence. Therefore, we feel we can afford to open our eyes and all our sense perceptions fully” (152). Since sentient beings have innate “basic wakefulness,” or “basic goodness,” a term Trungpa uses to describe our fundamental state of being that often becomes clouded by the ego, we have the capacity to end suffering by recognizing egolessness, through the renunciation of ego fascination. As we take up our pen to communicate our inner peace, we begin to bridge the gap between the inner and outer self, self and other, and realize interconnection.

Return to Open Space

When we realize open space, we realize the five elements: Vajra (white water) Ratna (yellow earth), Padma (red fire), Karma (green wind), and Buddha (blue space/sky). Contemplative Poetics investigates how the body, mind, and speech return to the elements, in life and death. With life and death staring me in the face, my body aches, my heart hurts, other organs feel tense, and yet, I find the means to breathe this tension into the earth, releasing the sensations from my grief. I can write to heal, I can sing, tone to move the energy through my body, to pay homage to life and death. James Schuyler’s “Hymn to Life” illustrates life as a delicate balance between suffering and awareness: “And someone/ you know well is suffering… I misunderstood silence for disapproval, see now it was/ Sympathy. Thank you, May, for these warm stirrings” (155-156). As I see my local and global community struggling with open space, the challenges it brings, the suffering, I look for the fine cutting edge that all at once illustrates the vastness and depth of reality. As we sit with these intense emotions, and study the dharma, through contemplative practices we return to the fundamental mind… bodhicitta mind.

-april joseph

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Please support the journal in which you want your work published. Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR BOMBAY GIN 39.2

Bombay Gin is taking submissions from February 1, 2013 through April 1, 2013.

In her introduction to the she said dialogues: flesh memory, Akilah Oliver offers the following definition of “flesh memory”: “the body’s truths and realities… everything that we’ve ever experienced or known, whether we know it directly or through some type of genetic memory, osmosis or environment.” Recognizing “the multiplicity of languages and realities” the bones hold, we can begin to identify the “demons” that haunts us. Grounded in dance and performance art, flesh memory becomes an embodied practice, an expression of culture and ancestral memory, as when Akilah writes, “this text is situated in the on-going work I’ve been doing in performance with the concept of flesh memory as it relates to a critical interrogation of the African American literary/performative tradition.”

With the late Akilah Oliver’s spirit and thought in mind, Bombay Gin invites submissions for issue 39.2 that explore “flesh memory.” We encourage contributors to extend Akilah’s “flesh memory.” Consider the following:

…what the body knows that the mind can’t hold, the DNA-memory of 500,000 years of human experience and 4 billion years of life on Earth, thinking is one way of knowing the world, the other is being…

…the memory of trauma, through repetition and the reinforcement of patterns, the body learns loneliness, self-destruction, body memory is paved into neural and muscular pathways….

… neuroplasticity—through consistent, positive action, dance, body work, we can heal the mind’s trauma that lies trapped in the body; like everything else, it is a matter of practice and patience, trial and error, repetition…

…how has the world impressed itself upon the body, how does the body hold its experiences? what does the body know? how do we return to the body? what does it mean to write from the body? how might flesh memory access the feral space below and beyond reason, the animal instinct and animal body?

We welcome manuscripts of fiction, essays, poetry, and cross-genre work. Poetry submissions should be comprised of 3-5 poems; prose and cross-genre manuscripts should generally consist of no more than 15 pages. Accompany each manuscript with a self-addressed stamped envelope for reply, and mail it to the following address:

BOMBAY GIN
NAROPA UNIVERSITY
JACK KEROUAC SCHOOL
2130 ARAPAHOE AVE.
BOULDER, CO 80302

Please support the journal in which you want your work published.  Bombay Gin can be purchased through SMALL PRESS DISTRIBUTION, on our website, or by sending a check for $12.00, made out to BOMBAY GIN. Thank you for your interest in our magazine.

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Win Suzanne Scanlon’s Promising Young Women

To celebrate our anticipation of issue 39.1, as we proof and proof, Bombay Gin editors are excited to kick off a series of book giveaways.  I’m proud to announce our first giveaway is in collaboration with Dorothy, A Publishing Project, a small press edited by the fantastic Danielle Dutton that brings us innovative “fiction, or near fiction, or about fiction, mostly by women.”

Dorothy publishes two books a year, in complement to one another, and Bombay Gin will publish reviews of and give away BOTH of the 2012 pair.

First: Suzanne Scanlon’s Promising Young Women.

Naropa University M.F.A. candidate Rachel M. Newlon’s review of Scanlon’s first book will appear in forthcoming (think January) 39.1.  Rachel’s work has been published online (Thirteen Myna Birds, Big River Poetry Review, Horse Less Press, Cactus Heart, Foliate Oak Literary Journal) as well as in print (A Poet’s View of Being, Erasure, Bombay Gin).  Rachel’s interview with Suzanne Scanlon enriches her thoughtful review.

Here is a little taste:

…women within the pages of Scanlon’s writings struggle to have a recognizable voice in a world that is unable to accept their gender, their madness and in which they have no part to play.  Promising Young Women mirrors the content of the ward book – scientifically exposing perspective, stereotypes, bias, and failure.

Scanlon’s writing induces a confusing sense of eternity – the reader is lost in this place, where events perpetuate repetitiously, realistically, with no hope of ceasing.  Scanlon merges pastiche and iconic cultural references about females and madness into a skillfully written piece that is nearly impossible to ignore.

I promise, you want to read this—Scanlon’s book and BG 39.1.

For a chance to win a free copy of Promising Young Women, simply leave a comment below telling us why you’re interested.

The window to enter this giveaway will close at Midnight MST on Friday, November 30th, and the winner will be randomly chosen via random.org.

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Some Helpful Submission Tips from Bombay Gin

Submitting creative work to a publication can be nerve racking for a number of reasons, especially if it is your first time. Gaining publication is an essential part of a working writer’s life, so here is a list of tips to help you along the way to becoming established writers.

1. Do Not Fear Rejection

This tip is the most important one I can give. You cannot fear rejection; it is going to happen, and it is ok. This is the first thing you, as a writer, need to grasp and understand. It is hard to send off your own work to be judged and analyzed by various editorial panels, but you should never take a rejection too close to heart. A rejection doesn’t mean anything about the quality of your writing. You could receive a rejection for any number of reasons. For example, your piece might not have fit the journal’s theme, you didn’t follow the journals guidelines, or the journal might not even read your work, because there is just too much to read. Whatever the case, you just need to continue to send your work to a number of publishers. Just be patient and have no fear; your work will find a home.

2. Submit to Journals You Like

Do your homework. When you are looking to submit work for publication, you should always look at journals that you admire or enjoy. Submit to journals you are familiar with so you know what type of work they publish. Mention in your cover letter that you have knowledge of the publication; it presents dedication on your part. Just make sure, regardless of where you submit, you do your research and take the time to learn about the publication. Take the time to read their mission statement. Know to whom you are submitting.

3. Follow the Guidelines

Always make sure to read and follow the guidelines for each journal and magazine to which you submit. Each journal has specific submissions guidelines. A journal’s guidelines tell you things like when to submit, how many pieces/pages to submit, the format in which to submit, and whether they take simultaneous submissions, among other things. Not following the guidelines gives the publisher an excuse to recycle your work and give you an immediate rejection. This is obviously what you are trying to avoid so always make sure to read the guidelines carefully first before submitting anything.

4. Write a Good Cover Letter.

A strong cover letter is essential, and you should take the time to create a template cover letter you can use to submit to various publications. A good cover letter should do the following:

  • Tout your accomplishments without telling your life story. You should mention your achievements, such as other publications and awards, but keep it brief. Most editors do not want to read an autobiography, because they have enough submissions to read as it is. Always update your letter as you accomplish more.
  • Include your contact information (address, number, email, etc). This way, the editors can contact with you about your submission or know where to send correspondance.
  • Mention your prior knowledge of the publication. This shows that you have taken the time to examine the publication before submitting and that you have connection with that particular publisher.
  • Makes you more appealing. For example, use “completing” instead of saying “going for my degree” when talking about your education. “Completing” tells a publisher that you are hard at work toward your goal and loyal to your craft.
  • Be courteous. Thank the editors for taking the time to read your work. Editors have a lot of reading and work on their hands.

5. Submit to as Many Places as You Can.

Most publications allow for simultaneous submissions, which means you can submit work to them that you have already submitted to other publishers. Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket, because what is not good for one journal might be good for another. If you do end up submitting work simultaneously, always make sure to contact other publishers after a piece gets picked up for publication so they know to disregard it from your submission.

6. Keep Track.

Create a chart or someway of organizing where you have submitted work. This is for your own personal record and sanity.

7. Be Patient.

Give the editors time to get back to you. If you submitted work to a journal two days ago, then don’t start asking them about the status of your submission. Likely, they haven’t even had a second to look at the majority of submissions they have received. It can take a few months for you to receive any word. If you haven’t heard anything from a publisher in over a few months then just assume your work was rejected and move on from there.

There is a lot of pressure, especially for younger writers, to gain publications in order to become more established. My hope is to help relieve some of that pressure with advice. Getting published is not easy; it takes a large amount of effort and persistence. These tips can get you on track toward gaining new honors and publications, setting you on the path toward becoming an established writer.

-Mike

Mike Malpiedi is a first year MFA candidate in the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics.  Mike also serves as Associate Editor, Graduate Assistant for Publications, for Bombay Gin.

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JKS Presents What Where Series II

Please join us for the second installation of the Jack Kerouac School’s What Where Series on Tuesday, October 23rd. A reading featuring Lidia Yuknavitch, Eric Baus, and Joanna Ruocco will begin at 7:30 pm in the Arapahoe Campus’ Performing Arts Center. This event is free and open to the public.

Lidia Yuknavitch is the author of the anti-memoir The Chronology of Water and the just released novel Dora: A Headcase: A Modern Farce, as well as three books of short stories and critical book on war and narrative. She is the recipient of an Oregon Book Award, a Pacific Northwest Bookseller’s Award, and was a finalist for the Pen Center Award in nonfiction. She teaches writing, women’s studies, and literature in Oregon with her husband the filmmaker Andy Mingo and their renaissance man son Miles. She runs the independnt press chiasmus (key-az-muss). She is a very, very good swimmer.

Eric Baus is the author of Scared Text, winner of the Colorado Prize (Colorado State U. Press), Tuned Droves (Octopus Books), and The To Sound, winner of the Verse Prize (Verse Press/Wave Books), as well as several chapbooks. His commentaries about poetry audio recordings, Notes on PennSound, recently appeared on Jacket2. He lives in Denver where he co-edits Marcel Chapbooks with Andrea Rexilius.

Joanna Ruocco co-edits Birkensnake, a fiction journal. She is the author of The Mothering Coven (Ellipsis Press), Man’s Companions (Tarpaulin Sky Press), A Compendium of Domestic Incidents (Noemi Press), and Another Governess / The Least Blacksmith: A Diptych (FC2).

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Electric Guitar Poet: Interviewing My Teacher Thurston Moore

by Katie Ingegneri

When I came to Boulder last January to start my MFA at the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University, I didn’t know…anything. Even though I had been writing since I was a small child in Concord, Massachusetts (a trip to the Orchard House, home of Louisa May Alcott and her family, inspired my first ghost story when I was a student at Alcott Elementary School), and spent most of my only-child life devouring books, the desire to become a writer only hit me sometime around the end of my third year of undergrad. After a highly academic, theory-intensive college experience, and given my love of deceased writers like Kerouac, Vonnegut, and Ginsberg, I thought I knew writers and writing. I knew names, I knew concepts. But I didn’t know what the scene was going to look like in the world I was placing myself into at Naropa.

I was only a few months into my first semester when we had to sign up for our workshops for Naropa’s 2011 Summer Writing Program. Some of my classmates had eagerly spoken of the fact Thurston Moore was coming – and I had no idea who he was. I discovered quickly that he is a founder of Sonic Youth, a band I had definitely heard of but never really listened to, apart from the cover of Bob Dylan’s “I’m Not There” that they did for the Todd Haynes movie of the same name. But never one to miss an opportunity to come in contact with music legends, I signed up for his workshop – along with many other hopeful students – and got in.

The research commenced. I downloaded his solo album that had just come out at the time, Demolished Thoughts, and marveled at the fact he was performing it on shows like “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” right before he was to come to Naropa. The gorgeous guitar chords, cello and harp in the background, and poetic lyrics were beautiful, but didn’t provide me with a full picture of what to expect from this Thurston. People told me to download Daydream Nation, apparently Sonic Youth’s best-known album, but at first, it was easier to get into their famous cover of The Carpenters’ “Superstar” (another cover I was aware of through the movies, this time in Juno) than shrieking guitars and unconventional song structure. I would soon discover that those shrieking guitars were in the lineage of musicians that I had grown up adoring, like Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground.

As I had just become an associate editor of Bombay Gin for the next school year, and my fellow editors were planning interviews with writers I had no awareness of at the time, I latched on to the fact that I would be in a class taught by an underground music legend and decided to ask him for an interview after our first class. I had been cautioned to be careful of making demands on the time of a legend, to be respectful and not necessarily expect too much.

But when Thurston first came into our classroom, appropriately held in the largest space in Naropa, the Performing Arts Center where all of our readings are held, he did not have the demeanor of a diva rock star who kept the world at bay. For all intents and purposes, he could have been another student in the class, wearing Converse sneakers and carrying a beat-up guitar case, and I would never have guessed that he was closer in age to my parents’ generation than mine.

As he started talking during our first class, I quickly realized we would have lots to talk about in this interview (that I had not yet asked him for). Yes, he was a musician, known for being a musician, but he was also a poet, who had devoted much of his energy over the years to not only writing but archiving the writing culture of underground and small-press poets. He showed us examples of his own journal that he had started, the Ecstatic Peace Poetry Journal, created in the tradition of hand-written and photocopied, stapled zines. The students all received folders of editions of these journals, plus sheets of notebook photocopies where Thurston had written his poetry and various ideas for what we would do in the class.

Here’s a scan of what would we would be doing as our class project that week: writing poetry, reading it into a tape recorder as he improvised music on his 12-string guitar, and re-recording cassettes until the result was a new “hybrid” as only the founder of Sonic Youth can produce: a new experience of words, music, and feedback that defied categorization.

We ended up meeting for an interview on the one day we didn’t have our workshop during the week. Thurston is an incredibly laid back, down-to-earth individual for someone occupying a position in our cultural realm that would otherwise entitle him to be a standoffish rock star, and conversation flowed easily as we walked from Naropa to a local coffee shop and back again, before we sat down in a quiet conference room, the only air-conditioned room I could find to escape the sweltering Boulder summer heat.

During the three hours we talked, we discussed a wealth of subjects tracking how he came to be so knowledgeable about the counterculture, from his teenage years driving from Connecticut to New York to see the first punk bands, to his realization that many of the musicians he admired, like Patti Smith and Lou Reed, had artistic origins in their admiration and emulation of Beat Generation writers like Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs. His stories of documenting the culture of small presses and underground publications that exist below the awareness of the cultural mainstream reveal an expert level of understanding and engagement with a facet of American literary culture that few are truly aware of. And the fact he was there, hanging out with Burroughs in Kansas or seeing Ted Berrigan walking around the Lower East Side, makes him a figure with remarkably unique knowledge that would be nearly impossible to duplicate.

Like my fellow associate editor Heather Goodrich and her interview with Vanessa Place, I have a 26-page Word document of the transcription from our  interview. There was not a minute during those hours when I was not fascinated, and there was so much more I wanted to include in my published version. But I had to keep the interview in Bombay Gin focused on what was strictly relevant to the interests I had set out to investigate on behalf of the Jack Kerouac School: the importance of the archive, how writers and writing functions in other fields like music, and how someone like Thurston Moore fits into the lineage of Naropa through his association with our legendary founders and teachers of the Beat Generation, and conversely, how Naropa fits into the lineage of underground experimental art and culture that extends beyond the realms of writing and our little campus in Boulder.

Later on, after the interview and on our last day of class, the students indulged our inner fans and asked for autographs and pictures, and Thurston was an excellent sport about it.

The Interviewee and The Interviewer

I spent the rest of the summer downloading every Sonic Youth and Thurston solo album I could find, and they became my new writing music of choice, as I find guitar distortion oddly soothing in many ways (and always have, so perhaps this was all inevitable). A few months after our class, Thurston announced to the world that he would be starting a new poetry imprint called Flowers + Cream Press. I like to think that his time at Naropa this past summer might have contributed to his decision to embrace writing and publishing more, given how well-versed he is on the subject. I also look forward to seeing him with his new press at the upcoming AWP (Association of Writers & Writing Programs) conference in Chicago at the end of this month, where some of the other editors and I will be with our new issue. (He is also slated to return to Naropa for the 2012 Summer Writing Program, which is very exciting.)

See our new issue of Bombay Gin for two of Thurston’s poems and our (highly-condensed) interview. Perhaps I will cobble together a more music-centric version of it for another publication. The most interesting thing about him and this whole process was not, ultimately, his extensive knowledge of the counter-culture of the past 50 years, or his discussion of his vast archive of that culture; it was the fact that he, himself, Thurston Moore, is the most interesting object of the archive, containing a wealth of knowledge and experience interacting and collaborating with everyone from Ginsberg and Burroughs to Patti Smith and Kurt Cobain. But if we can’t put him in a punk-rock museum, giving lectures on Lester Bangs and d.a. levy, then we’ll just have to give thanks that the underground is still alive and well, because, as he told me, “the underground is where all the foxes are.”

Here is Ambrose Bye’s video of the poetry reading Thurston gave during the 2011 Summer Writing Program.

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Bombay Gin 38.1 Release Party: The Threshold Has Arrived

The latest issue of Bombay Gin, Issue 38.1 – “Threshold: Tenuous Proposition Of“, has arrived! You are invited to our release party in honor of this fantastic issue, so save the date:

When: Sunday, February 12, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Where: The Dark Horse Bar, 2922 Baseline Road, Boulder, Colorado – our party is in the bar upstairs!

Why: Because it’s an amazing issue, and writers know how to party. Enough said.

Since the issue was created with the idea of “companion” pieces in mind, navigating the threshold between writers and their poetry, prints, fiction, and interviews, and since the party is occuring so close to what editor-in-chief J’Lyn Chapman has amusingly dubbed “the national holiday of companionship,” we are hosting a special open mic reading for “companions”. So grab another writer, dancer, musician, etc. and email agoldberg@naropa.edu to sign up for a 5-minute slot at the reading! Bonus points if you wear red or pink.

We will also be featuring drink deals on a special concoction, the “Gin-sberg,” named by yours truly, in honor of our beloved Jack Kerouac School co-founder Allen Ginsberg and the name of our journal, whose origins are still a mystery to me. (If you can provide me with concrete evidence as to who named “Bombay Gin,” I will give you a free copy of the new issue.)

Don’t forget your ID, as the Dark Horse is a 21+ bar. And don’t forget some cash to get your hands on this extremely special issue, featuring rock star interviews, rock star prints, and rock star writing from Naropa’s own core and Summer Writing Program faculty.

Can’t wait to see you there!

– Katie

Bombay Gin 38.1

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