Monthly Archives: November 2011

Buy Books on Cyber Monday

As Editor-in-Chief, I have the pleasure of also editing Bombay Gin’s book review section. I have to admit that this is one of my favorite duties as editor. I get to work closely with reviewers, most of whom are JKS students writing their first reviews. The process tends to be long, but the payoff is quite satisfying: not only do JKS students get some publishing credit and the gratification of finishing a project, poets and writers also benefit by having their books reviewed.

In our next issue, you will find the following reviews, and, since you are very likely to cyber shop during work today, go ahead and buy these books. We can guarantee your money will be well spent:

Jenny Boully, Not Merely Because of the Unknown that was Stalking Toward Them, Reviewed by Brenna Lee

Gérard Gavarry, Making a Novel, Reviewed by Denise Kinsley

Kirsten Kaschock, Sleight: A Novel, Reviewed by Kristen Park

Omar Pérez, Did You Hear About the Fighting Cat?, Reviewed by Kelly Alsup

Margaret Randall, Ruins and First Laugh: Essays 2000-2009, Reviewed by Diana K. McLean

Kate Zambreno, Green Girl, Reviewed by Heather Goodrich

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Threshold: Tenuous Proposition of

As has been the case for the last couple of years, this latest issue of Bombay Gin is thematic; yet this time around, that theme—“lunatic,” as the printer Wesley Tanner suggests in his interview—offers, posits, positions itself contingently. Threshold: a location with the tenuousness of proposition.

We chose to leave the threshold various, unstructured by classification or catalog but subject to its natural patterns:  four interviews—all conducted during the 2011 Summer Writing Program between Bombay Gin associate editors from the Jack Kerouac School and SWP writing and printing faculty—anchor the content. We have chosen to pair creative work—textual and visual—with the interviews and then to fill the matrix with the clay of individual pieces by some of our favorite writers. The section concludes with three poems and a lecture presented by Ana Božičević at the 2011 SWP and eventually available in the Naropa Audio Archives.  Then, as has been our custom, we end the issue with six book reviews, this time written exclusively by former and current JKS students.

It has been a pleasure to observe patterns form as if they operated within our design. That is, you will notice that some writers respond deliberately to the question of threshold, while for others the threshold is accidental—a silly word, “accidental,” because by tracking the presence of something, one, of course, engenders it.  Yet, these patterns strongly suggest a shared self-consciousness and anxiety about our unique moment in history, as if this moment is itself a threshold.

In early February, we will release Bombay Gin 38.1. Stay tuned for details regarding our release party. Until then, check out the writers who we will feature:

Vanessa Place
Lily Hoang
Dodie Bellamy
Ronaldo Wilson
Bhanu Kapil
DJ Spooky
Colin Frazer
Lara Durback
Julia Seko
Wesley Tanner
Christina Mengert
Erin  Morrill
Thurston Moore
Ana Božičević

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Call for Submissions

Bombay Gin, the biannual literary magazine of the Jack Kerouac School at Naropa University, is now accepting submissions from Colorado’s Front-Range writers for issue 38.2, due out in June 2012. We’re looking for short fiction, poetry, drama, creative nonfiction, and visual art, as well as work that defies categorization.

If you are a writer, living on Colorado’s Front Range, please send 10-12 pages of prose or up to 7 pages of poetry. We are also accepting up to 3 pieces of visual art. Please send your submissions to the following address no later than February 15:

Bombay Gin
Naropa University
Jack Kerouac School
2130 Arapahoe Ave
Boulder, CO 80301

Started in 1974, Bombay Gin is the literary journal of The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics—co-founded by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman—at Naropa University. Edited by department faculty and students, Bombay Gin publishes innovative poetry, prose, and hybrid texts as well as art, translations and interviews. Emerging from the “Outrider” or left-hand lineage, which operates outside the cultural mainstream, Bombay Gin honors a heritage of powerful scholarship and counter-poetics through the publication of work that challenges the boundaries of language, form, and genre.

Tagged , , , , ,

Calling all Front-Range Writers

J’Lyn Chapman here, writing from Chicago, Illinois, where I am about to celebrate Thanksgiving with friends and family. Per usual, my Chicago friends have been trying to tempt my husband and I to move to Chicago from Boulder, Colorado. For my husband, this would be a move back, as he grew up in Skokie, a suburb of Chicago. For me, it would mean a first-time move. Ironically, perhaps, I grew up in Colorado, and only moved away briefly and unhappily to attend graduate school in Florida. When I met my husband five or so years ago, I had been fondly dreaming of moving to Chicago, where I thought that surely I would be much happier. The neighborhoods, the train, the bloodymaries at the Matchbox, the many universities, and the literary scene appealed to me. I had attended a short residency at Wave Poetry’s Poetry Farm in southern Wisconsin, through which I met the mostly Chicago-based poets Lisa Fishman and Richard Meier. At the time, I had some good writer friends living in the area: Joshua Marie Wilkinson at Loyola University and Danielle Dutton and Marty Riker just a little south in Champaign-Urbana. When Josh recorded a video of me reading at the Art Institute for his video series Rabbit Light Movies, where I also discovered the Thorne Miniature Rooms, I felt like I needed to be here, in Chicago.

Of course Josh, Danielle, and Marty have moved away in the last year as people tend to do, but in those five years, I also found a very happy life in Boulder. I’ve been advising and teaching at Naropa University in what is now considered the Jack Kerouac School for nearly four years and have recently begun serving as the editor-in-chief of Bombay Gin. A few weeks ago, we hosted a fundraiser that demonstrated to me that I am not only part of a supportive community of students and faculty, but I also live in a gracious and considerate community of businesses that donated their goods and services to help out our program.

It’s absurd to list here the incredible opportunities that JKS has offered me. In addition to the consistently fantastic Summer Writing Program and working with writers like Michelle Naka PierceBhanu Kapil, and Anne Waldman, Reed Bye, and Jack Collom, I also get to bask in the wider community of Colorado’s Front Range. As the yearly 4×4 Reading Series makes manifest,  four writing programs anchor the Front Range; with these writing programs come dynamic writers and students, who operate presses and reading series.

I confess a failed attempt to list and link to all of these. Perhaps as today’s meal settles and the volume of the family’s teasing increases, I’ll sneak back to the computer and begin to list just a few of the many things that make Colorado’s Front Range a fertile ground for innovative writing. The point, however, is that even when Colorado’s maddening sun gets to me (some occasional cloud cover and rain is good for the mind and vegetation), I’m thankful I chose to live in Boulder, Colorado.

It is out of my and the Bombay Gin board’s appreciation for our fecund writing  and arts community that we invite Colorado’s Front-Range writers and artists to submit to the spring issue of Bombay Gin. Submissions are open until February 15, 2012. For more details, click on the Submissions link above. We look forward to seeing this community come together in the pages of our next issue.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

In the Current: A Night of Performance on the Threshold

This past weekend, I attended the CU Dance Department’s show In the Current. The second half of this show was dedicated to a piece entitled “VIofS,” which used questions inspired by Bhanu Kapil’s book Vertical Interrogation of Strangers.

For those of you who don’t know, Bhanu is an integral part of the Kerouac School. Our upcoming issue will feature pieces from her latest project, so it seemed almost too synchronistic that a performance which crosses the threshold of page to embodiment should occur the very weekend we editors completed our final proofreading.

The piece played with the line of structure and improvisation (a threshold in itself). Segments of set choreography were interlaced with moments where the audience members could approach a microphone and ask a question from a provided list (inspired by and working directly with Bhanu’s text). The performers would then break from the choreography to respond to the questions. The audience participation directed where the piece would go, and challenged the dancers to remain authentic in their improvised reactions.

During the discussion panel afterwards, the piece’s choreographer, Joan Bruemmer, noted the role bodies played in the piece — those of her dancers and of the audience. “They wrote the performance in their bodies,” she said, “And we just edited it.” There were themes of disassembly and repair in the conversation, with Joan reflecting on the challenge of “breaking the wall of performance and person.” Yet in this newly opened space, one dancer commended Joan’s ability to maintain an environment where one could “put the voice into the body (and still feel safe).”

We were so intrigued by the theme of threshold for this issue because of its multitudinous definitions. If you ask ten people to define “threshold,” you will get at least ten different answers. Seeing how Joan Bruemmer’s choreography approached the field of Bhanu’s page was yet another way threshold has appeared in my life lately. Despite what I am working on in the future, I imagine one type of threshold or another will always be pertinent in the tension of my writing, and possibly, eventually, in the translation of that writing into performance.

And what struck Bhanu most about watching her text cross the threshold into a performance space? “That little fragment that loops in the circularity of your creaturedom.”

Be sure to check out Bhanu’s blog  to keep up with her performance and writing projects, including the progression of the future novel we are highlighting in our upcoming issue!

Jade

Tagged , , , , , ,

Jack & Gin Fundraiser Success

Thank you everyone who supported the Jack & Gin fundraiser with their presence, prize donations, and raffle ticket purchases. With your help, we raised over $400 to assist with production costs for our upcoming  issues!

We had a great turn out filled with Kerouac School students, faculty, alumni, and friends. The gin and tonics were flowing, the prizes were plentiful, and our open mic featured impersonations of Ayn Rand, Jack Kerouac, and our upcoming Lenz lecturer Gary Snyder. I personally won a free yoga class and a signed copy of Anne Waldman’s The Iovis Trilogy in the raffle drawings. Score!

Here’s a few snapshots of the fun:

Faculty member Reed Bye presents some of his morning poems.

Poetry and Prizes!

Associate Editor Kristen Park gives us a bit of Jack & Gin

Now we editors must get back to the proofreading process so we can get this awesome issue in your hands. Be sure to check back here for details on our release party in early 2012!

Jade

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Jack & Gin Tonight at Bacaro

In only a few hours, the Jack & Gin fundraiser-open mic-party begins.

Bacaro Venetian Tavern (921 w. Pearl St.) at 7 p.m.

Come. Drink. Be merry. Celebrate Jack Kerouac and Bombay Gin by sipping Jack & Gin. There’s also an open mic, so come with work to read, if you like.

Don’t worry if you haven’t purchased raffle tickets yet because we’ll be selling them at the door for $10. If you’re planning on getting a ticket and don’t for whatever reason, you’ll be kicking yourself later.

We’ve had an outpouring of donations from local businesses and authors:  two tickets to Elephant Revival at the Boulder Theater, five yoga classes at The Yoga Pod, signed broadsides from Jack Collom, Harryette Mullen and Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and gift cards to Buffalo Exchange, Trident, OmTime, Southern Sun Pub and Ozo Coffee.

Not to mention, we also have signed copies of books from Laird Hunt, Anne Waldman and Michelle Naka Pierce. And: we’re also giving a rare copy of Sara Veglahn’s chapbook.

Ultimately: please come, even if you do not purchase a raffle ticket or read at the open mic. Either way, we’ll be happy to have your support.

Hope to see everyone who can make it tonight!

Best,

-Heather

Tagged , , , , ,

Mapping the Threshold through Affinity

Exciting editor’s meeting last night! We discussed how to organize our threshold issue.

Our concept of threshold begins as an intellectual and creative convergence. We asked contributors for companion pieces on their interpretation of threshold. This worked out as: creative work, hybrid forms, visual-text work, altered texts, interviews, critical essays and more.

What is the best way for these companion pieces to speak to themselves and among each other?

Solicitations taking over my room.

We decided to organize the issue by using the four interviews with Vanessa Place, Ronaldo V. Wilson, Thurston Moore and the four printshop gurus (Julia Seko, Lara Durback, Colin Frazer and Wesley Tanner). Then, our all-female editorial board mapped the rest of this piece through affinity. We crossed walls and bridges with affinity, like Cixous, Ronell and Butler did weeks ago (side note: if anyone has a video of this lecture…send it over, pleaseplease).

This mapping happened easily. A threshold talks. It is a gesture that holds and blurs borders. It is the gap and the transition. A pause. A real or imagined space. And now, the pieces are talking among each other as we proofread.

Have a wonderful evening,

–Heather

Tagged , , , , ,